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Buxus microphylla

Pronunciation: Buck-sus my-kro-fil-uh
Family: Buxaceae (boxwood family)
Common Name: Littleleaf boxwood, small-leaved boxwood, boxwood
Plant Type:
  • trees, shrubs
Height to: 6'
Width to: 6'
USDA Hardiness Zones:
  • -10 to -20ºF ZONE 5
  • 0 to -10ºF ZONE 6
  • 10 to 0ºF ZONE 7
  • 20 to 10ºF ZONE 8
  • 30 to 20ºF ZONE 9
Sun Exposure:
  • part sun
  • full sun
Bloom Description: They produce small star shaped yellowish green pistillate (female) and staminate (male) flowers on the same plants. The flowers are not showy, but are quite fragrant. The star points are actually sepals - boxwood flowers have no petals. The flowers are in clusters consisting of a single female flower in the center, surrounded by several male flowers, recognized by their conspicuous yellow anthers. Littleleaf boxwood has very small leaves, just 3/4 in (1. 9 cm) long, and considerably thinner in texture (almost transparent) than those of other boxwoods.
Propagation: Boxwood cuttings are fairly easy to root; take semiripe tip shoots in summer and root in a moist potting medium under mist or under a plastic "tent. " the species and even some of the cultivars can be propagated from seeds, which require 2-3 months of chilling before they will germinate
Notes for Identification: They produce small star shaped yellowish green pistillate (female) and staminate (male) flowers on the same plants. The flowers are not showy, but are quite fragrant. The star points are actually sepals - boxwood flowers have no petals. The flowers are in clusters consisting of a single female flower in the center, surrounded by several male flowers, recognized by their conspicuous yellow anthers. The boxwoods are among the most common hedge plants, but they also can be used for almost any landscaping application. Individual plants or small groups, unpruned, make fine specimens in dappled shade; planted close together and pruned to a smooth, undulating surface, boxwoods make a striking ground cover; the small cultivars can be used in knot gardens or as edging around borders. Boxwoods are, of course, the quintessential foundation plant, used to hide home foundations in american suburbs throughout most of the united states boxwoods are commonly used for topiary and they are well suited for bonsai. Littleleaf boxwood is especially well suited for shaping because its leaves are small and don't look ragged after trimming as do plants with larger leaves. Plant info from: floridata
Located in: Trees, Shrubs
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